Death on the Nile (1937) by Agatha Christie

Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie

10 Stars (10/10 stars)

“I am afraid,” he said simply. “Yes, I Hercule Poirot, am afraid.”

Heiress Linnet Ridgeway has everything. She’s beautiful, rich, and completely independent. When she meets handsome Simon Doyle, her happiness is complete. The fact that Simon is engaged to her friend Jacqueline de Bellefort is surely just a technicality. Jackie doesn’t see it that way, however. She devotes herself to making the couple miserable, trailing them wherever they go.

As Linnet confides to Hercule Poirot, the newlyweds hope that a Nile cruise will help them escape Jacqueline. But Jacqueline isn’t the only one who might be dangerous to them. Someone like Linnet, who has so much of everything and takes it all for granted, provokes strong reactions. In the shadow of ancient temples, death has never been nearer, leading to a shocking crime. It won’t be easy for even the great Poirot to uncover a shipload of deadly secrets. Continue reading “Death on the Nile (1937) by Agatha Christie”

Lord Edgware Dies (1933) by Agatha Christie

Book cover of Lord Edgware Dies/Thirteen at Dinner by Agatha Christie (1933)

7 Stars (7/10 stars)

“When planning a murder never depend upon a woman doing what she says she’ll do.”

As a famous actress, Jane Wilkinson is used to being the center of attention. But this time, she’s the one seeking an audience with a celebrity, master detective Hercule Poirot. Her request is simple: “M. Poirot, somehow or other I’ve just got to get rid of my husband!” Continue reading “Lord Edgware Dies (1933) by Agatha Christie”

Death at Breakfast (1936) by John Rhode

Book cover of Death at Breakfast by John Rhode (1936)

6 stars (6/10 stars)

“An affair like this is like a jigsaw puzzle. As soon as you get the first few pieces put together, the rest fall into their places quite naturally.”

No one likes Victor Harleston, least of all his sister Janet, who is desperate to escape his control. So when Victor drops dead during a breakfast prepared by Janet, Scotland Yard naturally takes an interest. Poison in the teapot and a bottle of deadly nicotine in Janet’s bedroom appear to make this an open and shut case.

Yet somehow it all looks a little too easy for Superintendent Haslet’s liking. A second murder seems to prove his instincts correct. Along with Inspector Jimmy Waghorn and the brilliant amateur detective Dr Priestley, Haslet must learn how very deceiving appearances can be.

Continue reading “Death at Breakfast (1936) by John Rhode”